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Introduction to Catholic Liturgy 5141B

TUESDAY 9:30 - 11:20
Room 108, St. Peter's Seminary

Instructor:  Rev. Pierre Robitaille

1 - 416 - 698-1105
E-mail: pierrecharles43@hotmail.com
Office Hours by Appointment 

A. COURSE DESCRIPTION

A basic exploration of the Sacramental celebrations, The Liturgy of The Hours, and The Liturgical Time and Space of the Roman Rite from their historical, theological, biblical, spiritual and pastoral perspectives.

B. GOALS

The acquisition of primordial and useful information in preparing one for the ministry of liturgical leadership and the proper celebration of the Roman Rite.

C. ASSIGNMENTS AND MARKING SCHEMA:

There will be 3 written assignments required for this course. Each of these will be valued at 20% of the final mark. These papers are to be 4-6 pages, double spaced. They are to be in 12-point font.

The papers are to represent a 12-15 minute talk that you might be asked to present to explain the subject on which the assignment is based. The audience for this talk is a group that you could find in a parish or school environment – i.e. the R.C.I.A., Knights of Columbus, Catholic Women’s League.

These assignments must be typed and will be graded on both content and form. Attention should be paid to style, grammar, spelling and punctuation, as well as to the presentation of the subject matter. The standard norms for academic honesty will be enforced.

Assignments should be handed in as close to the due date as possible. ABSOLUTELY NO assignments will be accepted after the class on Tuesday, April 5, 2011. 

Assignment One (February 1, 2011):

You are asked to give a talk to a group of adults to explain to them what liturgy is and why it is important in the life of a Christian. Your talk should emphasize, in an accessible manner, the theological, spiritual and ecclesial dimensions of the liturgy.

Assignment Two (March 1, 2011):

You are asked to explain ONE of the following rites: 1) the rite of Christian initiation for adults celebrated at the Easter Vigil; 2) the rite of baptism for a child; or 3) the Eucharistic liturgy celebrated at the Sunday Mass. Your explanation should refer directly to the rite itself and should explain the importance of the symbols and rites that are found in the celebration. It will be impossible in a talk of 12-15 minutes to deal with everything. You will have to select those aspects of the rite that you believe are the most important. Your talk should include reference to the spiritual and theological importance of the rite.

Assignment Three (March 22, 2011):

You are asked to give a talk that explains ONE of the following: 1) the Liturgy of the Hours; 2) the significance of Sunday; 3) the liturgical year. Your explanation should highlight some of the theological, historical and spiritual aspects of the matter that you are presenting. It will be impossible in a talk of 12-15 minutes to deal with everything. You will have to select those aspects that you believe are the most important.

Final Exam:

The final EXAM will count for 40% of the final grade. The final EXAM will count for 40% of the final grade. It will be a twenty-minute oral comprehensive examination covering all of the material of the course: the required readings and the lectures.

D. READINGS OR TEXTBOOKS

A. Required:

Catechism of the Catholic Church. Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops,1994.

Sacrosanctum Concilium (The Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy). Can be found in: Austin Flannery, ed. Vatican Council II, Vol.1, The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents, New Revised Edition. Costello Publishing Company: Northport, New York, 1998.

The Rites, Vol. 1. New York: Pueblo Publishing Company, 1990.

White, James F. Introduction to Christian Worship. Abingdon: Nashville, 2000. (Third Edition)

White, James F. Roman Catholic Worship: Trent to Today. Paulist Press: New York, 1995.

E. SCHEDULE, TOPICS & READINGS

1. January 4: Introduction to the Fundamentals of the Liturgy of the Roman Rite.

Required readings:
1. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1066-1209 (pp. 233-266 in the edition published by the CCCB).
2. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 17-46.

2. January 11: A Brief Survey of the History of the Roman Rite.

Required readings:
1. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 132-146, pp. 151-165, pp. 229-248.

3. January 18: Vatican Council II’s Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy – Sacrosanctum Concilium.

Required readings:
1. The Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy (Sacrosanctum Concilium). This can be found in: Austin Flannery, ed. Vatican Council II, Vol.1, The Conciliar and Post Conciliar Documents, pp. 1-36.

4. January 25: The Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (R.C.I.A.).

Required readings:
1. Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, in The Rites, vol. 1, pp. 15-47.
2. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 203-228.

5. February 1: Rite of Baptism for Children.

Required readings:
1. Rite of Baptism for Children, in The Rites, vol. 1, pp. 361-375.
2. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1213-1284 (pp. 277-282).

6. February 8: The Eucharist.

Required readings:
1. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1322-1413 (pp. 285-304).
2. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 229-262.

7. February 15: The Rite of Penance.

Required readings:
1. Rite of Penance in The Rites, vol. 1, pp. 519-544.
2. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1422-1499 (pp. 305-320).
3. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 263-304.

8. March 1: The Rite of Marriage.

Required readings:
1. Rite of Marriage in The Rites, vol. 1, pp. 717-724.
2. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1601-1666 (pp. 341-353).

9. March 8: Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites for the Anointing and Viaticum.

Required readings:
1. Pastoral Care of the Sick: Rites of Anointing and Viaticum, in The Rites, vol. 1, pp. 761-780.
2. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1499-1532 (pp. 320-326).

10. March 15: The Liturgical Year.

Required readings:
1. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1163-1173 (pp. 255-257).
2. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 81-110.

11. March 22: The Liturgy of the Hours.

Required readings:
1. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1174-1178 (pp. 257-258).
2. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 131-150.

12. March 29: The Order of Christian Funerals.

Required readings:
1. Ordo of Christian Funerals, in The Rites, vol. 1, pp. 911-944.
2. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1680-1690 (pp. 356-358).

13. April 5: Liturgical Space.

Required readings:
1. Catechism of the Catholic Church, nn. 1179-1186 (pp. 258-260).
2. James F. White, Introduction to Christian Worship, pp. 81-110.
3. James F. White, Roman Catholic Worship, pp. 115-140. 


F. POLICIES REGARDING SUBMISSION OF ASSIGNMENTS AND TESTS

1. Assignments are due at the beginning of class on the dates as given above. Assignments may not be dropped off at King’s or submitted electronically.

2. It is the responsibility of the student to organize his or her work so that the assignments are completed on time. For a serious reason, a student may approach the professor before the due-date, and may be granted an extension at the discretion of the professor. Any medical reasons will be confirmed by proper documentation as approved by the Dean’s Office. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment will be deducted for each day it is overdue without permission.

3. No electronic devices will be allowed during tests or the examination, unless approved in advance by Student Services at the University or King’s. (This refers to students with disabilities who have permission to use a word processor to write their exams/tests.)

4. Students who miss tests will negotiate a “make-up” date with the professor. Any medical reasons will be confirmed by proper documentation as approved by the Dean’s Office.
 

G. UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS

Students are responsible for knowing the University’s academic policies and regulations and any particularities of their own course of study. These can all be found at the University’s website (http://www.uwo.ca/univsec/handbook/appeals/scholoff.pdf). Ignorance of these policies is not an excuse for any violation thereof. The following policies are particularly important to note:

  1. Submission of Assignments: It is the responsibility of the student to organize his or her work so that the assignments are completed on time. A penalty of 10% of the value of the assignment will be deducted for each day it is overdue without permission.
     
  2. Plagiarism: Students must write their essays and assignments in their own words. Whenever students take an idea or a passage from another author, they must acknowledge their debt by quotation marks and/or footnotes. Plagiarism is a major academic offense. Students may be required to submit their work in electronic form for plagiarism checking.
     
  3. Selection and Registration of Courses: Students are responsible for ensuring that their selection of courses is appropriate and accurately recorded, that all prerequisite course(s) have been successfully completed, and that they are aware of any anti-requisite course(s) that they have taken.